You are here

ISCRAM2009 Best Paper Award and Mike Meleshkin Award

Category: 

ISCRAM2009



ISCRAM2009 Best Paper Award Winners
 

Winner Mike Meleshkin Award for the best student paper: Nitesh Bharosa (Delft University of Technology), paper co-authored by Marijn Janssen

Paper: Reconsidering information management roles and capabilities in disaster response decision-making units

Comments from the Award committee (Sophia Liu, Simon French, Theresa Jefferson, Bartel Van de Walle, Frank Fiedrich)

In his paper Nitesh adopts a theory-driven approach to develop a set of information management roles and dynamic capabilities for disaster management. Building on the principles of advance structuring and dynamic adjustment, Nitesh and his co-author develop a set of roles and capabilities, which are then illustrated and extended using two field studies in the Netherlands. The paper is important because it addresses a very important issue: what are essential characteristics of information systems in our domain? The paper provides a thorough assessment for why information systems need to facilitate adaptivity and it provides a good balance between theory and empirical evidence from field studies. The paper also includes a critical reflection and takes a multidisciplinary perspective and we believe it has the potential to advance this field.

Winners ISCRAM2009 Best Paper Award: Zeno E. Franco, Nina Zumel, John Holman, Kathy Blau, Larry E. Beutler (from Pacific Graduate School of Psychology and Quimba Software)

Paper: Evaluating the Impact of Improvisation on the Incident Command System: A Modified Single Case Study using the DDD Simulator

Comments of the committee (David Mendonca, Tim Grant, Jack Harrald, Kees Nieuwenhuis, Frank Fiedrich)

This multidisplinary paper evaluates the utility of the Incident Command System (ICS) in varying disaster contexts. As many of you know ICS is mandated in the United States to be used during incident and disaster response. The authors address important theoretical issues - namely information processing and improvisation - with a clear impact on information systems for crisis management in a real-world context. The paper gives a sound and convincing rationale in developing its ideas. Improvisation is operationalised for simulation by grounding in previous research. The paper is well structured and written, with a clear and concise presentation of the research questions, the used methods and the analysis. It reflects on the results, and explicitly identifies its limitations and the further research needed.
 

Institutional Members

PARTNERS

     

Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer